Compliance

Hubblebit values your security and privacy. Protecting your privacy is one of our top priorities. This privacy policy sets out how we collect information regarding Website users, what we may do with it, and what you can do to protect your privacy.

We are using security measures and encryption systems, to make sure interaction with our website is smooth and safe. All transactions are performed under secured protocols, using the username and password chosen and guarded by you; the chances of someone else trading in your name are extremely low.

Keeping your password safe: You should make sure that you don’t share the password with anyone and remember that Hubblebit’s personnel will never ask you for the password. If this happens and someone claims to be working for Hubblebit, don’t provide them with any information and make sure you notify our customer service at once. Pick a password that is hard to intercept and change it every couple of months. Also remember to log out as soon as you stop trading with Hubblebit, whenever you leave the computer and after every session.

The first step to start trading is to open an account and this process, simple as it is, requires you to enter some personal data such as your first and last name, email and phone number. Additional details, as well as proof of identity may be required of you at any time. Hubblebit will maintain the privacy of all your personal data we collect, including age, occupation or marital status. You may be required to provide the copies of ID, passport and photograph, in accordance with any policies that require such documents to be delivered. Furthermore, in some jurisdiction you may also need to submit financial information, investment experience and risk tolerance, all as may be required under law.

In order to have unrestricted access to the trading account and be able to trade with ease, these documents and information may be required. There is no obligation on your part to submit them, but if you don’t, you won’t be able to open the account and trade online. Additionally, it is important to keep us informed about your personal data as soon as something important changes, so your profile will always be up to date, and as required under any law.

We collect this information to administer and operate services, prevent fraud, defend our legal rights and for the purpose of compliance regarding the services we provide. Hubblebit’s privacy policy guarantees that your personal information will not be sold, rented or traded, and won’t be disclosed unless the following conditions occur or for the purposes set out above. We share information with the associated firms and other persons processing your personal information or with banks and clearing houses in order to deliver the products and services you need for trading.

When there is any suspicion of fraud or breach regarding the trading performed by the user, the privacy policy allows us to disclose your private data as needed, including to credit reference and fraud prevention agencies. The same applies for the national an international enforcement bodies and courts when they require this kind of information.Except for these situations, while you are trading with Hubblebit, your personal information is reasonably safe from unauthorized use, damage, modification or disclosure, by all reasonable measures.

Underage and Child Privacy
By using this website you state and represent that you are over the age of 18 or any agree restriction applicable in your jurisdiction in order to participate in trading, as any laws applicable to your may dictate. If you are under aged and entered the site by mistake, you should stop using the website and inform us promptly.
Regardless of the foregoing, in order to protect child privacy, we never knowingly collect or maintain information from users under 13, and no part of our website is structured to attract anyone under the age of 13. Should Website ever collect or maintain any such information, it will comply with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) and any other applicable law, under the appropriate jurisdiction.

Changes to This Privacy Policy
This privacy policy may be changed from time to time, as we see fit. The binding version is the most updated version posted on the site. We may, at our discretion, inform you via e-mail regarding any material changes.
Please note any and all usage of the site and services is subject to the Terms and Conditions, as may be amended from time to time by Hubblebit, at its sole discretion.

Contact Us
For queries concerning policy matters, please contact us at anytime.

Address
Address is a place where cryptocurrency can be sent to and from, in the form of a string of letters and numbers. A cryptocurrency address can be shared publicly in the form of text or QR code to those who want to send you cryptocurrency.
Airdrop
Airdrop is a marketing campaign that distributes a specific cryptocurrency or token to an audience. It is usually initiated by the creator of a cryptocurrency in order to encourage the use and build the popularity of the coin or token. Most airdrop campaigns run with mechanics such as receiving coins or tokens in exchange for simple tasks like sharing news, referring friends, or downloading an app.
Algorithm
Algorithm is a process or set of rules to be followed in problem-solving or calculation operations, usually by a computer, although humans tend to follow steps algorithmically as well (let’s say doing math or following a recipe).
All Time Low (ATL)
An All-Time Low (ATL), or a record low is the lowest price yet since a financial instrument was unveiled. All-time lows can be recorded per year, month, per week, or day. For Bitcoin, ATLs usually follow bad news about the coin or waning interest from holders and users.
Alpha
A software development team often works to release its product in stages. A common practice is to solicit input and advice from a community, such that ideas, suggestions, and improvements can be shared and incorporated before a final product is released to the general public.
Altcoin
Altcoin is the term given to describe alternative digital assets, such as a coin or token that is not Bitcoin. This nomenclature comes from the idea that Bitcoin is the original cryptocurrency and that all others are then considered “alternate” or “alternative” coins.
Altcoin Trader
An Altcoin trader is a person who trades cryptocurrencies, But not with Bitcoin, Because Bitcoin is not Altcoin. Top altcoins: Eth, BNB, DOT, ADA, LTC, XRP. link, etc.
AML
Anti-money laundering (AML) is a broad term for laws and regulations put in place to prevent criminals from making money illegally or moving illicit funds. While many illegal activities are targeted by AML laws, some of the most important are tax evasion, public corruption, and market manipulation through methods such as wash trading.

Anarcho-capitalism
A political philosophy and school of thought that believes in removing centralized states in favor of self-ownership, private property and free markets. Many of the early adopters of Bitcoin were proponents of anarcho-capitalism, believing it would give power and control back to the masses.
API
API stands for Application Programming Interface. It is a set of routines, protocols, and tools for building software applications. APIs specify how software components should interact, such as what data to use and what actions should be taken.
Arbitrage
A practice of taking advantage of differences in price of the same commodity in two or more markets or exchanges. For example, cryptocurrency prices on Korean exchanges can be different from those on US exchanges. An arbitrage trader would be in both markets in order to buy in one and sell in another for profit.
Ashdraked
A situation where you lose all your money, more specifically when you lose all your money shorting Bitcoin. This was based on a story of a Romanian trader who continued to short BTC when it went from $300 to $500, since he had made a lot of profit doing so historically. Adapt your trading strategy!
ASIC
Short for ‘Application Specific Integrated Circuit’; it is a mining equipment that is used specifically to mine a certain cryptocurrency. Often compared to GPUs, ASICs are specially created and bought for mining purposes and offer significant efficiency improvements and power savings due to its narrow use case.
Astroturfing
A deceptive practice where a sponsor is masked or hidden, making it seem as though a marketing message came from and is strongly supported by the community when it is not.
ATH
The term “All-Time High” relates to the highest price that an asset has achieved on an exchange, for the current trading pair that is being referenced. For example, if a share of stock in XZY Corp comes to IPO at a price of $5 per share, then trades as high as $20 per share, before falling to $10 in a certain period of time, we could say that the “All-Time High” for the XZY Corp share price was $20.
Atomic Swap
Atomic swap is a technology based on smart contracts that enables the exchange of different cryptocurrencies without the need for a centralized market or other intermediaries. Also known as atomic cross-chain trading, atomic swaps involve the trade of one cryptocurrency to another, even if they are running in different blockchain networks.
Attack 51%
If more than half the computer power or mining hash rate on a network is run by a single person or a single group of people, then a 51% attack is in operation. This means that this entity has full control of the network and can negatively affect a cryptocurrency by taking over mining operations, stopping or changing transactions, and double-spending (reusing) coins.
Attestation Ledger
An attestation ledger is an account book designed to provide evidence of individual transactions. It is generally used to “attest” that a financial transaction took place, or to prove authenticity of transactions or products.

Bag
In the crypto space, the word bag refers to the coins, and tokens one is holding as part of their portfolio. Typically, the term is used to describe a significant amount of a particular cryptocurrency. There is no defined minimum, but when the value is relatively high, one could say they are holding “heavy bags” of a certain coin or token.
Bagholder
A person who holds large quantities, or bags, of a cryptocurrency. Often used to describe such a person when the price of that cryptocurrency is declining.
Bear Market
The term bear market refers to a negative trend in the prices of a market. It is widely used not only in the cryptocurrency space but also in the traditional markets, such as stocks, bonds, real estate, and commodities markets.
Bear Trap
A technique played by a group of traders, aimed at manipulating the price of a cryptocurrency. The bear trap is set by selling a large amount of the same cryptocurrency at the same time, fooling the market into thinking there is an upcoming price decline.
Bitcoin
Bitcoin is a digital form of money that runs on a distributed network of computers “nodes”. In a broader sense, though, many people often use the word Bitcoin to refer to a few different things: a digital currency, a decentralized public ledger, a protocol, or simply the big ecosystem that encompasses all of these.
Bitcoin ATM “BTM”
A machine from which you can Buy or Sell Bitcoin and get Cash. Example: BTC to USD, BTC to EUR, etc.
At the moment in the world are 7586+ active bitcoin ATM machine

Bitcoin Halving
Bitcoin Halving is an event that occurs approximately every four years and prevents coin inflation while halving the reward for miners for a mined block.
Bitcoin Improvement Proposal “BIP”
Bitcoin Improvement Proposal is A technical design document providing information to the Bitcoin community, describing new proposed features, processes or environments affecting the Bitcoin protocol. Suggested changes to the protocol are submitted as a BIP. The BIP author is responsible for soliciting feedback and consensus for his or her suggested improvements within the community and documenting dissenting opinions.
BitLicense
A business license issued to cryptocurrency companies in New York, created and provided by the New York State Department of Financial Services (NYSDFS).
Bits
Bits is a sub-unit of one bitcoin. Any form of money needs to be easily broken down into sub-units to allow an equal exchange for goods or services. And bitcoin is wonderfully divisible, with its smallest unit being the tiny 0.00000001 of a bitcoin – a unit known as a ‘satoshi’. There are 1,000,000 bits in one bitcoin.
Block
A container or collection of transactions occurring every time period on a blockchain. In short, the term block refers to computer files that store transaction data. These blocks are arranged in a linear sequence that forms an endless chain of blocks – hence, the term blockchain.
Block Explorer
An online tool to view all transactions that have taken place on the blockchain, network hash rate, and transaction growth, among other useful information. In short, a block explorer is a tool that provides detailed analytics about a blockchain network since its first day at the genesis block. We can say a block explorer acts as a search engine and browser where users can find information about individual blocks, public addresses, and transactions associated with a specific cryptocurrency.
Block Height
The number of blocks preceding the block in question on the blockchain, or can be thought of as total blocks in the chain before this point.
Block Reward
An incentive for a miner who successfully calculates a valid hash in a block during mining. By contributing to the security and liveness of the chain, the miner is rewarded with this incentive, ensuring that miners continue to act in the best interest of the blockchain by legitimately taking part in the process (instead of hacking it).
Blockchain
A blockchain is a continuously growing, append-only, list of records called blocks, which are linked and secured using cryptography.
Bollinger Band
A tool developed by Bollinger to help in the recognition of systemic pattern recognition in prices; it is a band that is plotted two standard deviations away from the simple moving average, or exponential moving average in some cases.
Bots
Automated trading software bots that execute trade orders extremely quickly, based on a preset algorithm of buy-and-sell rules.
Brute Force Attack “BFA”
Brute Force Attack is a method of trial-and-error, in which automated software generates and tries a large number of possible combinations in order to crack a code or key.
Bubble
A bubble describes a situation where market participants drive prices up above their value, which is usually followed by a steep, rapid drop in prices as the market corrects.
Bug Bounty
A reward offered for finding vulnerabilities and issues in computer code. It is often offered by cryptocurrency companies like protocols, exchanges and wallets to identify potential security breaches or bugs before they are exploited by unfriendly parties.
Bull Market
The term bull market refers to a positive trend in the prices of a market. It is broadly used not only in the cryptocurrency space but also in the traditional markets. In short, a bull market concerns to a strong market uptrend that presents meaningful rising prices over a relatively short period of time. When compared to traditional markets, cryptocurrency markets are smaller and consequently more volatile. Therefore, it is quite common to see strong and consistent bull runs, where a 40% price increase in 1 or 2 days is quite common.
Bull Trap
A false market signal where the declining trend of an asset appears to be on the upturn, but does not actually materialize, leading bulls to lose money after going long.
Burned
When a coin or token has been made permanently unspendable or unusable.

Buy The F**** Dip – BTD / BTFD
Buy The F**** Dip an enthusiastic exclamation by supporters of a cryptocurrency to buy while prices are at a low point.
Buy Wall
A situation where a large limit order has been placed to buy when a cryptocurrency reaches a certain value. This can sometimes be used by traders to create a certain impression in the market, preventing a cryptocurrency from falling below that value, as demand will likely outstrip supply when the order is executed.
Byzantine Fault Tolerance “BFT”
Byzantine Fault Tolerance is a property of fault-tolerant distributed computing systems, reaching consensus through a mechanism, where components may fail and there may be imperfect information. For example, Bitcoin is Byzantine Fault Tolerant, utilizing the Proof-of-Work system to reach a consensus on the blockchain. Its applications are beyond blockchain, including messaging and networking systems, among others.
Byzantine Generals Problem
Byzantine Generals Problem is a situation where communication that requires consensus on a single strategy from all members within a group or party cannot be trusted or verified. An example of this agreement problem is where a group of generals, encircled around a city, must decide whether to attack or retreat. Every general must agree to attack or retreat, or everyone will be worse off. Some generals may be treacherous, voting falsely, and messengers may deliver false votes. Under these circumstances, a consensus must be reached. In cryptocurrency, when network participants post false or inaccurate information to others about transactions taking place, it could lead to network failure.

Candlesticks
Candlesticks is a graphing technique used to show changes in price over time. Each candle provides 4 points of information: opening price, closing price, high, and low. Also known as “candles” for short.
Cash
Cash is physical form of a currency, such as banknotes or coins.
Central Ledger
A ledger maintained by a centralized agency (such as a bank) that records all financial transactions.
Central Processing Unit (CPU)
Central Processing Unit, also known as a processor or CPU, is defined as the “brains” of the computer, coordinating different components running on a computer. CPU clock speed is measured in gigahertz or GHz for short.

Centralized
The concept of centralization relates to the distribution of power and authority in an organization or a network. When a system is centralized, it means that the planning and decision-making mechanisms are concentrated at a particular point within the system.
Chain Split
Chain Split is another term used to describe Fork and is accordingly a situation where a blockchain splits into two separate chains. Chain Splits generally happen in the crypto world when new governance rules are built into the blockchain’s code.
Change
Bitcoin transactions are made up of inputs and outputs, in a system called Unspent Transaction Output. When you send bitcoins, you can only send them in a whole output, and the rest are sent back as change.
Cipher
The name given to the algorithm that encrypts and decrypts information.
Circulating Supply
The best approximation of the number of coins that are circulating in the market and in the general public’s hands.
Close
Refers to the closing price; similar to the same term used in financial stocks.
Cloud Mining
Mining with remote processing power rented from companies operating outfits in countries like Iceland, where the electricity is abundant and cost-efficient, and the ambient temperature is cold year-round. Another term for this is mining contract.
Co-Signer
A person or entity that has partial control and access over a cryptocurrency wallet.
Coin
Coin is a cryptocurrency or digital cash that is independent of any other blockchain or platform. The key feature of a coin is that of a currency, and the term may also be used to describe a cryptocurrency asset that is not a token.
Coinbase
First designed in the Bitcoin system, a coinbase is a compulsorily-included transaction on a block, the output of which directs where to send the mining reward. In the Bitcoin system, the coinbase has a 100-byte size input, where messages can be attached or used as an extra nonce.
Cold Storage
Offline storage of cryptocurrencies, typically involving hardware non-custodial wallets, USBs, offline computers, or paper wallets
Cold Wallet
A cryptocurrency wallet that is in cold storage, i.e. not connected to the internet.
Confirmations
A transaction is only confirmed when it is included in a block on the blockchain, at which point it has one confirmation. Each additional block is another confirmation. Different exchanges require a different number of confirmations to consider a cryptocurrency transaction final.
Consensus
Consensus is achieved when all participants of the network agree on the order and content of blocks and transactions contained in those blocks.
Consortium Blockchain
A privately-owned and -operated blockchain in which a consortium shares information not readily available to the public, while relying on the immutable and transparent properties of the blockchain.
Correction
A correction is a (usually negative) reverse movement of at least 10% in a cryptocurrency or general market, to adjust for over- or under-valuations.
Crypto Angel Investor
Angel Investor Also called a seed or private investor, angel investors actively seek out opportunities to provide funding for entrepreneurs or start-up companies. They are often individuals with high net worth who are seeking new methods of expanding their wealth while simultaneously helping to launch an up and coming venture.
Crypto Fundamental Analysis
Crypto Fundamental Analysis This is a method of measuring core strengths that not only determines the risks associated with any cryptocurrency but also have a large impact on the cryptocurrency price action.
Crypto-jacking
The use of another party’s computer to mine cryptocurrency without their consent.
Cryptoasset
Cryptoassets leverage cryptography, consensus algorithms, distributed ledgers, peer-to-peer technology and/or smart contracts to function as a store of value, medium of exchange, unit of account, or decentralized application.

Cryptocurrency
A cryptocurrency is a digital medium of exchange using strong cryptography to secure financial transactions, control the creation of additional units, and verify the transfer of assets.
Cryptographic Hash Function
Cryptographic hashes produce a fixed-size and unique hash value from variable-size transaction input. The SHA-256 algorithm is an example of a cryptographic hash function.
Cryptography
A field of study and practice to secure information, preventing third parties from reading information to which they are not privy.
Custodial
Usually referring to the storage of keys, in relation to wallets or exchanges, a custodial set-up is one in which private keys are being held by the service provider while they provide a login account.
Cypherpunk
An activist who advocates for the mass adoption and use of strong cryptographic solutions and privacy-enhancing technologies to enact social and political progress.

Dark Web
A portion of internet content existing on darknets, not indexed by search engines, that can only be accessed with specific software, configurations or authorizations.
Date of Launch
Is a term used for when ICOs will put up their tokens for sale.
Dead Cat Bounce
A temporary recovery in prices after a huge decrease.
Decentralized
Decentralization refers to the property of a system in which nodes or actors work in concert in a distributed fashion to achieve a global goal.
Decentralized Applications (dApps)
A type of application that runs on a decentralized network, avoiding a single point of failure.
Decentralized Autonomous Initial Coin Offerings (DAICO)
A method for decentralized funding of projects, combining ideas from Decentralized Autonomous Organizations (DAOs) and Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs), proposed by Vitalik Buterin, creator of Ethereum. It introduces a form of governance in the ICO process, allowing backers to vote for the return of their funds if certain conditions are met.
Decentralized Autonomous Organizations (DAO)
An organization that is run through rules encoded in smart contracts.
Decentralized Exchange (DEX)
A peer-to-peer exchange that allows users to buy and sell cryptocurrency and other assets without a central intermediary involved.
Decryption
The process of transforming data that has been rendered unreadable through encryption back to its unencrypted form.
Deflation
Reduction of the general level of prices in an economy. May also refer to deflationary monetary policy, such as Bitcoin, where there is a fixed supply of coins.
Delegated Proof-of-Stake (DPOS)
A consensus mechanism where users can vote for delegates producing blocks on the blockchain, with votes proportional to their stake. It aims to increase efficiency and environmental friendliness of blockchain consensus protocols.
Depth Chart
A graph that plots the requests to buy (bids) and the requests to sell (asks) on a chart, based on limit orders. The chart shows the point at which the market is most likely to accept a transaction.
Derivative
A contract deriving its value from the performance of an underlying asset, index, or interest rate.
Derivatives Market
A public market for derivatives, instruments such as futures contracts or options, which are derived from other forms of cryptocurrency assets.
Deterministic Wallet
A type of wallet that derives keys from a starting point called a seed. As long as you have this seed, you are able to backup and restore any wallet.
Difficulty
A relative measure of how difficult it is to discover a new block. In Bitcoin, the difficulty is adjusted periodically as a function of how much hashing power has been deployed by the network of miners.
Digital Commodity
An intangible asset that is transferred electronically, and has a certain value.

Digital Currency
Digital currency, also known as digital money or electronic money or electronic currency, is a type of currency available only in digital form, allowing for instantaneous transactions and borderless transfer-of-ownership.
Digital Identity
Digital representations and storage of personal information such as name, address, social security number, and more; on the blockchain, digital identity can be decentralized and used for identity verification in a secure manner.
Digital Signature
A digital code generated by key encryption that is attached to an electronically transmitted document to verify its contents and the sender’s identity.
Dildo
A dildo is a long green or red bar found on a graph showing the changes in price of a cryptocurrency, in relation to the green and red candles found on price charts.
Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG)
A directed acyclic graph or DAG is a structure that is built out in one single direction and in such a way that it never repeats.
Distributed Consensus
Collective agreement by various computers in a network enabling it to work in a decentralized manner without a central authority.
Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) Attack
A cyber-attack in which the perpetrator seeks to make a machine or network resource unavailable, disrupting services of a host connected to the Internet, by overloading the system with requests so that legitimate requests cannot be served.
Distributed Ledger
Distributed ledgers are ledgers in which data is stored across a network of decentralized nodes. A distributed ledger does not necessarily involve a cryptocurrency and may be permissioned and private.
Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT)
The technology underlying distributed ledgers. This term is most often discussed in the context of enterprise use cases around adoption of distributed ledger technology.
Distributed Network
A type of network where processing power and data are spread over the nodes without a centralized data center or authority.
Dolphin
A person who owns a moderate quantity of cryptocurrency. This person does not qualify to be a whale, but has evolved from being a fish/minnow.
Dominance
Also known as BTC Dominance for Bitcoin Dominance, it is an index that compares the market capitalization of Bitcoin with the overall market cap of all other cryptocurrencies in existence.
Double Spending
A situation where a sum of money is (illegitimately) spent more than once.
Dump
To sell off all your coins.
Dumping
The action of collective market sell-offs, creating downward price movement.
Dust Transactions
Minuscule transactions that flood and slow the network, usually deliberately created by people looking to disrupt it.
DYOR
Age-old adage: “Do Your Own Research”. Don’t just take people at their word.

ELI5
Stands for “Explain Like I’m 5”, an explanation so simple that even a five-year-old can understand it.
Emission
Emission, also known as Emission Curve, Emission Rate, and Emission Schedule, is the speed at which new coins are created and released.
Enterprise Ethereum Alliance (EEA)
A group of Ethereum developers, startups, and large corporations working together to commercialize and use Ethereum for business applications.
ERC-20
A token standard for Ethereum, used for smart contracts implementing tokens. It is a common list of rules defining interactions between tokens, including transfer between addresses and data access.
ERC-721
A token standard for non-fungible Ethereum tokens. An Ethereum Improvement Proposal introduced in 2017, it enables smart contracts to operate as tradeable tokens similar to ERC-20 tokens.
Escrow
An escrow is a contractual arrangement in which a third party receives and disburses money or documents for the primary transacting parties, with the disbursement dependent on conditions, agreed to by the transacting parties. This is possible to be automated using smart contracts on the blockchain.
Ether
The form of payment used in the operation of the distribution application platform, Ethereum, in order to incentivize machines into executing the requested operations.
Ethereum Improvement Proposal (EIP)
Ethereum Improvement Proposals EIP, Means describes standards for the Ethereum platform, including core protocol specifications, client APIs, and contract standards.
Ethereum Virtual Machine (EVM)
A Turing-complete virtual machine that enables execution of code exactly as intended; it is the runtime environment for every smart contract. Every Ethereum node runs on the EVM to maintain consensus across the blockchain.
Exchange
Cryptocurrency exchanges (sometimes called digital currency exchanges) are businesses that allow customers to trade cryptocurrencies for fiat money or other cryptocurrencies.
Exchange Traded Fund (ETF)
A security that tracks a basket of assets such as stocks, bonds, and cryptocurrencies but can be traded like a single stock.

Faucet
A cryptocurrency reward system usually on a website or app, that rewards users for completing certain tasks. It is mostly a technique used when first launching an altcoin to interest people in the coin.
Fiat
Fiat currency is “legal tender” backed by a central government, such as the Federal Reserve, and with its own banking system, such as fractional reserve banking. It can take the form of physical cash, or it can be represented electronically, such as with bank credit.
Fiat-Pegged Cryptocurrency
Also known as “pegged cryptocurrency”, it is a coin, token, or asset issued on a blockchain that is linked to a government- or bank-issued currency. Each pegged cryptocurrency is guaranteed to have a specific cash value in reserves at all times.
Fish
A fish, or minnow, is someone who holds insignificant amounts of cryptocurrencies, often at the mercy of whales who move the market up and down.
Flippening
A situation hoped for by Ethereum fans, where the total market cap of Ethereum surpasses the total market cap of Bitcoin.
Flipping
An investment strategy (mostly popularized by real estate investing) where you buy something with the goal of reselling for a profit later, usually in a short period of time. In the context of ICOs, flipping refers to the strategy of investing in tokens before they are listed on exchanges, then quickly reselling them for a profit when they start trading on exchanges in the secondary market.
FOMO
An acronym that stands for ‘fear of missing out’ and in the context of investing, refers to the feeling of apprehension for missing out on a potentially profitable investment opportunity and regretting it later.
Fork (Blockchain)
Forks, or chain splits, create an alternate version of the blockchain, leaving two blockchains to run simultaneously. An example is Ethereum and Ethereum Classic, which was forked after the DAO hack.
Fork (Software)
A software fork, also known as a project fork, is when developers take the technology (source code) from one existing software project and modify it to create a new project. An example is Litecoin, which was a software fork of Bitcoin.
FUD
An acronym that stands for “fear, uncertainty, and doubt”. It is a strategy to influence perception of certain cryptocurrencies or the cryptocurrency market in general by spreading negative, misleading or false information.
FUDster
Someone that is spreading FUD.
Full Node
Nodes that download a blockchain’s entire history in order to observe and enforce its rules.
Fundamental Analysis (FA)
A method in which you research the underlying value of an asset by looking at the technology, team, growth prospects and other indicators. Some people perform fundamental analysis as part of an investment strategy called “value investing”.
Futures
A futures contract is a standardized legal agreement to buy or sell a particular commodity or asset at a predetermined price at a specified time in the future. They are different from forward contracts, which can be customized for each trade and can be conducted over-the-counter, instead of being traded on an exchange.